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Recommended Reading

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The Safety Consultant Toolkit is for those who aspire to establish a safety consulting practice or those who have already started and need a boost. The field of safety consulting is not saturated, and this book will help you understand how to set yourself apart from other consultants by starting off with a solid foundation. Once that foundation is set, the book guides you in some creative tactics that worked for the author with prompts on how to make the strategies work for you. 

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We hear it all the time: “Sorry, it was just an accident.” And we’ve been deeply conditioned to just accept that explanation and move on. But as Jessie Singer argues convincingly: There are no such things as accidents. The vast majority of mishaps are not random but predictable and preventable. Singer uncovers just how the term “accident” itself protects those in power and leaves the most vulnerable in harm’s way, preventing investigations, pushing off debts, blaming the victims, diluting anger, and even sparking empathy for the perpetrators.

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This book is your chance to learn from a total safety nerd on how to keep yourself, friends, family, and colleagues safer at work, home, the lake, the roads, wherever you may roam. It’s not an extensive manual, because safety isn’t that f*cking hard (credit episode 000 of the Safety Justice League podcast). This book is my encouragement to you to listen to your own internal voice and nurture The Safety Habit that’s been there all along.

This book was inspired by the COVID lockdown and contains some references to COVID that were current as of July 2020.

Thank you to James Altucher for providing the nudge to write this book during a 30-day book challenge!

Read more about The Safety Habit at www.thesafetyhabit.com.  

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This book is what started all of this. What was initially a conversation with my Dad on his front porch one October evening turned into the most enlightening journey of my career. It’s a book filled with stories, but if it doesn’t make you ask questions, you’re reading it wrong. There’s a better way to do safety. We just need to start doing it!

A Practical Guide to the Safety Profession: The Relentless Pursuit will help reshape the way we talk about safety, prompt action, and engage workers from all levels of an organization. The book includes real-life experiences and characters that are relatable to anyone who has worked in the Safety and Health field for any amount of time. It will provide answers for every safety professional who has ever asked: “is this actually making people safer?” It shines a light on ineffective practices that drive a wedge between the safety professional and the people they support and then provides meaningful alternative practices.

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Great human performance (GHP) is crucial to achieving your ultimate goal of personal success. Navigating the roadblocks to GHP can be one of the most difficult things you ever do. Asking yourself one easy question before you start your day can help, “Have you MAPPED out your day?” Tim will guide you through his personal experiences and stories he’s heard from his time on the road so you can anecdotally relate them to your own.

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At the core of The Relationship Factor in Safety Leadership are eight beliefs about human nature that are common to leaders who successfully communicate that safety is important while meeting business results. Using stories and business language the book explains how to create and recover important stakeholder relationships by setting priorities and taking action based on these beliefs.

The beliefs are based on the author’s 25 years of experience supporting operational and safety leaders with successful and unsuccessful change efforts in pharmaceutical, nuclear, mining, manufacturing and power generation. The author also offers compelling evidence from many social and scientific disciplines that support the conclusion that satisfying our need for relationship is a major motivator.